elven glare

(no subject)

 I have been asked to organise a winter solstice ritual for a small eclectic group (I have to have the ritual outlines in a week), we are looking at how the various rituals are celebrated in different traditions, and I have decided to look at the Egyptian tradition, with the rebirth of Osiris. However, I am now slightly stuck, even with the excellent google, on finding appropriate stuff for honouring the rebirth of Osiris in particular.. Any ideas most gratefully recieved..?
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Passing on the news

Well I know some of you might have seen this before, but I will be posting links, articles and pics of course from other groups I am in, might as share the wealth with ever one. Some I will put behind lj-cuts if the are long, or huge pics, if they are short I will just post normally!!  So enjoy!!

SAQQARA, Egypt - Archeologists unveiled Tuesday the tombs of a Pharaonic butler and scribe that had been buried in the sand for more than 3,000 years.

The tombs, along with the painted coffins of a priest and his girlfriend, were discovered early this year at Saqqara near the famous Step Pyramid of King Djoser — the oldest of Egypt's more than 90 pyramids.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17238153/
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Quote, Word and Deity of the Week

QUOTES OF THE WEEK:

Abscence is to love what wind is to fire; it extinguishes the small, it enkindles the great.
(L'abscence est a l'amour ce qu'est au feu le vent; it eteint le petit)
                                             --Comte De Bussy-Rabutin



"My honour was not yielded, but conquered merely."
                                               --Cleopatra


WORD OF THE WEEK:

Synthesis: /ˈsɪn θəsɪs/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[sin-thuh-sis] noun
 a.
To put together parts or elements to get to the whole.
 b.
High stage of truth
 c.
Make connections among parts or among wholes



DEITY OF THE WEEK:

Neith
by Alan G. Hefner
Neith is a goddess of Lower Egypt particularly associated with Sais but soon incorporated into the national pantheon with a sanctuary at Memphis. According to legend Neith emerged from the primeval water to create the world. She followed the course of the Nile to the sea, and when reaching the Delta she formed the city of Sais.

In the New Kingdom she was regarded as the "god's mother who bore Re," whereby she assumed the position of a primeval goddess who was neither male nor female. She was the first to "create the seed of gods and men." She is the mother of Egyptian rulers. Also she was a mortuary goddess who watched over Osiris' brier along with Isis, Nephthys and Serket. The deceased received her divine power by means of the mummy's wrappings, for the bandages and shrouds were considered gifts of Neith, who was regarded as the patroness of weaving. Possibly there was an earlier proposal that her symbol was the weaver's shuttle.

When depicted in human form she wears the red crown of Lower Egypt, and in ancient times her pre-anthropomorphic symbol was a shield bearing crosses because she also was a local war goddess. This goddess of war also blessed hunters' weapons. The practice of placing weapons around the coffin in ancient Egyptian times could be traced to the goddess' protective functions.

She was sometimes asked to give advice and judgment, as, for example, in the eight-year war of the gods between Seth and Horus, which she advised Re in favor of Horus. In other legends she was the consort of Seth and mother of the crocodile god Sobek, which explains the proximity of her cult center in the Delta.

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Thought many would enjoy this.

Well normally I won't post these here, but this is very fitting. So enjoy and feel to post your results and discuss. I know I have the post cards that list all the Birthdays and card. The cards are very beautiful and infromative. Anyway, enjoy and hope everyone has a wonderful weekend.








Anubis



Clever, fatalist, deep. Sympathetic, generous, loving and perseverant in proving their view point

Colors: male: sienna, female: crimson
Compatible Signs:
Bastet, Isis
Dates:
May 8 - May 27, Jun 29 - Jul 13

Role: God of death and mummification
Appearance:
Jackal or a jackal-headed man
Sacred animals:
jackal


What is Your Egyptian Zodiac Sign?
Designed by CyberWarlock of Warlock's Quizzles and Quandaries




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Quotes, Word and Deity of the Week

QUOTES OF THE WEEK:

"All strange and terrible events are welcome, but comforts we despise."
                                                          --Cleopatra

Never play leapfrog with unicorn.
                              
                --Unknown


WORD OF THE WEEK:

Transcendent: [tran-sen-duh nt] adjective
 a.
Beyond comprehension
 b.
Exceeding usual limits, surpassing
 c.
Beyond all limits of knowledge



DEITY OF THE WEEK:

Horus

by Stephanie Cass
The name "Horus" is a general catchall for multiple deities, the most famous of whom is Harseisis (Heru-sa-Aset) or Horus-son-of-Isis (sometimes called Horus the Younger) who was conceived after the death of his father, Osiris, and who later avenged him. In all the Horus deities the traits of kingship, sky and solar symbology, and victory reoccur. As the prototype of the earthly king, there were as many Horus gods as there were rulers of Egypt, if not more.

The oldest of the Horus gods is appropriately named Horus the Elder (Heru-ur), and was especially venerated in pre-Dynastic Upper Egypt along with Hathor. In this very ancient form, Horus is also a creator god, the falcon who flew up at the beginning of time. The pre-Pharaohnic rulers of Upper Egypt were considered "shemsu-Heru" or "followers of Horus", and the original Horus is himself considered in some myths to be the brother of Seth and Osiris, second-born of the five children of Geb and Nut (Osiris, Horus, Seth, Isis, Nephthys). Horus the Elder's city was Letopolis, and his eyes were thought to be the sun and moon. When these two heavenly bodies are invisible (as on the night of the new moon) he goes blind and takes the name Mekhenty-er-irty, "He who has no eyes". When he recovers them, he becomes Khenty-irty, "He who has eyes". A warrior-god armed with a sword, Horus could be especially dangerous to those around him in his vision-deprived state, and during one battle in particular he managed to not only knock off the heads of his enemies but of the other deities fighting alongside him, thus plunging the world into immediate confusion that was only relieved when his eyes returned.

Other notable Horus gods are the previously mentioned Harseisis, as well as Horus of Behdet (sometimes called simply Behdety) who was represented as a winged sun disk, Anhur (a form of Horus the Elder and Shu), Horakhety (Ra-Heru-akhety) who was a syncretism of Ra and Horus, and Harpokrates (Heru-pa-khered) or Horus the Child. In the form of Harpokrates, Horus is the danger-beset son of Isis with one finger to his lips, signifying his childish nature (also evident in his princely sidelock and naked status). Harpokrates represented not only the royal heir, but also the newborn sun.

Horus deities are frequently depicted as hawks or hawk-headed men, though some are represented as fully human. The pharaoh was considered to be the Living Horus, the temporal stand-in for Horus in the earthly domain. As the opponent of Seth (who, though initially an Upper Egyptian deity himself, later came to represent not only Lower Egypt but the desert surrounding Egypt), Horus is alternately a brother vying for the throne and unification of Egypt (Horus the Elder), or a royal heir come to reclaim his inheritance (Horus the Younger).

Horus can be seen at the top of the serekh of early kings, though in very rare cases his place was usurped by Set (Peribsen, Dynasty 2) or even shared with him (Khasekhemwy, Dynasty 2). Horus is also depicted on the famous Narmer palette along with Bat, an earlier form of Hathor.

A passage from the Coffin Texts (passage 148) sums up Horus in his own words:

"I am Horus, the great Falcon upon the ramparts of the house of him of the hidden name. My flight has reached the horizon. I have passed by the gods of Nut. I have gone further than the gods of old. Even the most ancient bird could not equal my very first flight. I have removed my place beyond the powers of Set, the foe of my father Osiris. No other god could do what I have done. I have brought the ways of eternity to the twilight of the morning. I am unique in my flight. My wrath will be turned against the enemy of my father Osiris and I will put him beneath my feet in my name of 'Red Cloak'."


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Quotes, Word and Deity of the Week

QUOTES OF THE WEEK:

"Be it known that we, the greatest, are misthought."
                                                     --Cleopatra

One owes respect to the living; but to the dead one owes nothing but the truth.
                              
               --Voltaire [Francois-Marie Arouet]


DEITY OF THE WEEK:

Thoth

by Marianne Dixon
Thoth is the name given by the Greeks to the Egyptian god Djeheuty. Thoth was the god of wisdom, inventor of writing, patron of scribes and the divine mediator. He is most often represented as a man with the head of an ibis, holding a scribal palette and reed pen. He could also be shown completely as an ibis or a baboon.
As with most Egyptian deities there were many different stories regarding the parentage of Thoth. Many sources call him the son of Re, but one tradition has him springing forth from the head of Seth. This latter story is reminiscent of the birth of the Greek goddess Athena, who like Thoth was the patron divinity of wisdom.

Myths concerning Thoth show him as a divinity whose counsel is always sought. His most significant role is during the battles of Horus and Seth. Thoth is a staunch supporter of Horus and his mother Isis, maintaining that Horus' claim to the throne is just and the murderous Seth has no right to the kingship of Egypt. Elsewhere Thoth is a reliable mediator and peacemaker. When the goddess Tefnut had a dispute with her father Re and absconded to Nubia, it was Thoth that the sun-god sent to reason with her and bring her home. Thoth was also present at the judgement of the dead. He would question the deceased before recording the result of the weighing of the deceased's heart. If the result was favorable Thoth would declare the deceased as a righteous individual who was worthy of a blessed afterlife.

Thoth was also a lunar deity, and whatever form he took he wore a lunar crescent on his head. Some Egyptologists think that the Egyptians identified the crescent moon with the curved beak of the ibis. It is also suggested that the Egyptians observed that baboon was a nocturnal (i.e. lunar) animal who would greet the sun with chattering noises each morning.

As he was messenger of the gods Thoth was identified by the Greeks with their own god Hermes . For this reason Thoth's center of worship is still known to us today as Hermopolis.



WORD OF THE WEEK:

--pontificate (pŏn-tĭfĭ-kĭt, -kāt′) noun   to speak in a pompous and over bearing way; to express one's opinion with arrogance


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Quotes, Word and Deity of the Week

QUOTES OF THE WEEK:

"I will not be triumphed over."
                                               --Cleopatra

One owes respect to the living; but to the dead one owes nothing but the truth.
                                             --Voltaire [Francois-Marie Arouet]


WORD OF THE WEEK:

--
uxorious \uk-SOR-ee-us; ug-ZOR-\,
           adjective:
excessively fond of or submissive to a wife

DEITY OF THE WEEK:

Seth by Micha F. Lindemans
The ancient Egyptian god of chaos, the embodiment of hostility and even of outright evil. He is also a god of war, deserts, storms, and foreign lands. As the god of deserts he protects the caravans which travel through the desert, but he also causes sandstorms which bring him into conflict with the fertility god Osiris. The two are adversaries and in the Osiris myths, Seth killed his brother and scattered the remains all over Egypt. Seth belongs to the Ennead of Heliopolis and is the son of Geb and Nut (or Re and Nut). He is the brother of Osiris, Isis, and Nephthys, who is sometimes given as his consort, although Seth is more commonly associated with the foreign, Semitic goddesses Astarte and Anat. During the 3rd millenium BCE Seth replaced Horus as the tutelary deity of the pharaohs, but the story of Osiris' murder gained currency and Horus was restored to his original status. The war that followed lasted eighty years, during which Seth tore out Horus' left eye and Horus tore off Seth's foreleg and testicles. Eventually, Horus emerged victorious, or was deemed the victor by the council of the gods, and thus became the rightful ruler of the kingdoms of Lower and Upper Egypt. Seth was forced to return the eye of Horus and was either castrated or killed. In other versions he went to live with the sungod Re, where he became the voice of thunder. In the Book of the Dead, Seth is called "Lord of the Northern Sky" and is held responsible for storms and cloudy weather.

Despite his reputation, Seth has some good characteristics. He protects the sun barge of Re during its nightly journey through the underworld and he fights the snake-like monster Apep. On the other hand, he was a peril for ordinary Egyptians in the underworld, where he was said to seize the souls of the unwary.

Seth was portrayed as a man with the head of undeterminable origin, although some see in it the head of an aardvark. He had a curved snout, erect square-tipped ears and a long forked tail. He was sometimes entirely in animal form with the body similar to that of a greyhound. Animals sacred to this god where the dog, the jackal, the gazelle, the donkey, the crocodile, the hippopotamus, and the pig. There was an important sanctuary at Ombos in Upper Egypt, his reputed birthplace, and considered to be the home of his cult. This cult was also prominent in the north-eastern region of the Nile delta. The Greeks equated him with their Typhon.

The name of Seth in hieroglyphs
The name of Seth in hieroglyphs.

Other names include Sutekh, Setech, and Sutech.

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Quotes, Word and Deity of the Week

Quotes:

"A thought, even a possibility, can shatter and transform us."
                              
                                                  --Friedrich Nietzsche

"A divorcee is a woman who got married so she didn't have to work, but now works so she doesn't have to get married."
                                                                                --Cleopatra

Word:

in·dis·tinct:

1. Not clearly or sharply delineated: an indistinct pattern; indistinct shapes in the gloom.  2. Faint; dim: indistinct stars  3.a. Hazy; vague: indistinct memory: an indistinct notion of how to proceed.  b. Difficult to understand or make out: indistinct speech.



Deity:

Seb:
by Micha F. Lindemans
As the son of Shu and Tefnut, Seb was the Egyptian earth god. He was masculine, contrasting with the tradition that the guardian of the earth was usually female. Osiris, Isis, Seth, and Nephthys were his children and he was brother and husband to Nuit. In early Egyptian history, Seb was known as Geb or Keb, but in later forms of the language it became Seb. Seb's sacred animal and symbol was the goose; he was often referred to as the "Great Cackler." His skin was either green or black. The green represented the the color of living things and the black was the color of the fertile Nile mud. It was believed that Seb imprisoned wicked souls, so they couldn't ascend to heaven.
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Quotes, Word and Deity of the Week

Well I have a new project that I am working on.  It seems when I have a little small task that I have to do everyday or even once a week, it helps to keep my focused on other projects that I have to do.  When I did my daily calendar postings, I rarely feel behind on other projects.  Last year i didn't really have a project persay to work on and I have found out I ended up forgetting a thing or two.  Well it might of been the fact that I was trying to go to two schools at once.  but either way, my project for this year will be called Quotes, Word and Deity of the week.  I think I will post them on Monday's, as that is when I will have a lot of down time. 

This will be a two part project as I will also be doing weekly quotes for my    
egypts_calendar    group that I mod.  It will be a little more challenging for that group as trying to find 52 + quotes that deal with Egypt might be a real challenge, but then again that's what I am looking for, a challenge.  Atleast finding 52 Words and Deities won't be hard.  Nothing to big that it will take away from my school work, but will also give my ideas for papers and such as I work my way through a 3rd term at PCC.

So here it the 1st weeks set of quotes, hope you all enjoy them and feel free to share some of your favorite quotes, words and deities with me.  Please remember to add who the quote is from.


QUOTES:

“Fool! Don't you see now that I could have poisoned you a hundred times had I been able to live without you.”

                                                                                         --Cleopatra 69 BC-30 BC

"Love is a canvas furnished by Nature and embroidered by imagination
                                                                                         --Voltaire [Francois-Marie Arouet]


Word:

maikin:
  1. An untidy woman; a slattern.  2. A scarecrow or a grotesque effigy.  3. A mop made of a bundle or rags fastened to a stick.  4. A cat.  5. A hare


Deity:

Osiris by Katherine Fischer

Osiris was the Egyptian god of the underworld, although he was also worshipped as a fertility, resurrection, and vegetation god. He was married to Isis, a sky goddess. He was father to Horus, the god of sky, and protector of the dead.

Osiris was killed by his brother Seth, who shut his body in a chest and threw it into the Nile, where it washed up onto the shore and was trapped in a huge tree. The King Byblos turned it into a pillar in his palace. Isis (who had been searching for her husband) discovered the trunk, and retrieved the trunk and the body. While Isis was away, Seth found the body, and chopped it up into many pieces, and scattered them throughout Egypt. Isis and her sister, Nephthys, found the pieces and made wax models of them to give to priests to be worshipped. When they found all of his pieces, they were so sad they wailed loudly enough for Re, the father god, to have pity on them. He sent Anubis and Thoth to help. They mummified Osiris, and put his body in a lion headed pier. Isis changed into a kite and fanned breath into Osiris.

He was not allowed to stay in the land of the living, and was sent to the underworld to serve as king, and to judge the souls of the dead.